DRUŠTVO BIOLOGOV SLOVENIJE
Biological Society of Slovenia

 

 

Contents (Abstracts)

Volumes

11: 1 (1963)    40: 3-4 (1995)    42: 2 (1999)    43: 3 (2000)    44: 1-2 (2001)    45: 2 (2002)    46: 1 (2003)    47: 1 (2004)    47: 2 (2004)    48: 1 (2005)    48: 2 (2005)    49: 1 (2006)    49: 2 (2006)    50: 1 (2007)    50: 2 (2007)    51: 1 (2008)    51: 2 (2008)    52: 1 (2009)    52: 2 (2009)    53: 1 (2010)    53: 2 (2010)    54: 1 (2011)    54: 2 (2011)    55: 1 (2012)    55: 2 (2012)    56: 1 (2013)    56: 2 (2013)    57: 1 (2014)    57: 2 (2014)    58: 1 (2015)    58: 2 (2015)    59: 1 (2016)    59: 2 (2016)   

Contents: Volume 49, Nr. 1 (2006)


Status and distribution of the lynx in the Swiss Alps 2000-2004


MOLINARI-JOBIN Anja, ZIMMERMANN F., ANGST Ch., BREITENMOSER-WÜRSTEN Ch., CAPT S., BREITENMOSER U.

Abstract

To evaluate the 2000-2004 status of lynx in the Swiss Alps, we outlined the trend within the large carnivore management compartments and estimated the number of lynx present. Throughout Switzerland all reports of lynx signs of presence were collected and classified according to their reliability. From 2000-2004, more than 2000 signs of lynx presence were recorded from the Swiss Alps. The trend of the confirmed records collected over all of Switzerland showed that (1) the lynx population in the North-western Alps decreased compared to the previous pentad but nevertheless this compartment remained the area with the highest lynx density within Switzerland, (2) in the Valais and Central Switzerland West the trend is slightly positive, (3) due to the translocation project, the distribution of lynx in the Swiss Alps has considerably increased and (4) that there is still good lynx habitat yet to be colonised in the Swiss Alps.

To estimate the number of lynx, we used findings from systematic camera trap sessions and a radio-telemetry study as well as our expert guess. We estimated the number of lynx in 2004 at 60-90 individuals. Compared to the previous pentad, when the number of lynx in the Swiss Alps was estimated at 70, the number of lynx remained fairly stable. An expansion in the total distribution was compensated for by a decrease in the North-western Alps.

Keywords

Lynx lynx , Switzerland, status, distribution, Alps, monitoring


Status of the Eurasian lynx ( Lynx lynx ) in the Italian Alps: an overview 2000-2004


MOLINARI Paolo, BIONDA Radames, CARMIGNOLA Giorgio, CATELLO Marco, CETTO Ermanno, FILACORDA Stefano, GAVAGNIN Patrizia, MINGOZZI Toni, RODOLFI Massimiliano, MOLINARI-JOBIN Anja

Abstract

To assess the status of lynx we analysed lynx signs of presence within the Italian Alps from 2000-2004. A total of 411 signs of lynx presence have been collected, compared to 261 signs during the previous pentad. Lynx tracks were the most frequent sign of presence, followed by prey remains and direct observations. Livestock depredation has so far not been a problem in Italy. Most of the presence signs (84%) are still concentrated in the Eastern Italian Alps in Friuli V.G. and the province of Belluno. A few confirmed lynx signs of presence indicate a recolonisation of the Trentino Alto Adige region. In the western Alps (Piemonte region), most signs of lynx presence are concentrated close to the French border. The number of lynx occurring in Italy is roughly estimated to less than 20 individuals. The population cannot be considered viable and is still depending on immigration from neighboring countries.

Keywords

Lynx lynx , Italy, monitoring, status, Alps


Survey of the Lynx distribution in the French Alps: 2000 – 2004 population status analysis


MARBOUTIN E., DUCHAMP C., ROULAND P., LÉONARD Y., BOYER J., CATUSSE M., MIGOT P., VANDEL J. M., STAHL P.

Abstract

Within the SCALP framework, the status of the pan-alpine population of Eurasian Lynx is assessed every 5 years, based on the compilation of national reports and standardized classification of lynx presence signs according to data confidence levels (C1, C2, C3). From 2000 to 2004, the French national network of lynx experts collected N= 393 data, out of which 224 (compared to only 69 in 1995-1999) were considered as robust enough to evidence the presence of lynx (C1 = 1%; C2 = 42%; C3 = 57%) and were used for further analysis. A majority of the signs concerned the northern part of the Alps, however, in mostly two regions (Chartreuse/Epine : 34% of the signs; Maurienne: 21%). Other data were more scattered over space, from the Chablais region close to Switzerland down to the Haut-Verdon close to the Mercantour mountains. A negative trend was noticed from north to south in proportions of best quality signs (C1+C2), and a positive one in low quality ones - C3 - ( ˛ = 3.56, 1 df, p = 0.06), which could point at some methodological artefacts. Discarding C3 may however be too conservative a strategy to assess the species range and status. Using spatial recurren ce and trend over time of all signs available (C1+C2+C3) could, therefore, provide the right balance between being too much versus not enough conservative. - When doing so, the area with lynx signs regularly detected sharply increased between 1996-1998 (10 0 km˛), 1999-2001 (250 km˛), and 2002-2004 (1195 km˛). The latter area is still quite small regarding what is required for a viable large carnivore population. A simple demographic model suggested that even a quite moderate proportion of immigrants (e.g. d ispersal inflow from neighbouring core areas – French Jura or Swiss Alps) could considerably decrease the theoretical demographic extinction risk of such a small population, but still depending upon adult survival rates, which also strongly influenced the extinction risk. The factors that may influence this sensitivity analysis (such as habitat connectivity and management of wooded corridors) should be evaluated within the Scalp framework.

Keywords

Lynx lynx , France, Alps, distribution, monitoring, population viability


Status and distribution of the Eurasian lynx ( Lynx lynx L.) in Slovenia in 2000 – 2004 and comparison with the years 1995 – 1999


KOREN Iztok, JONOZOVIÈ Marko, KOS Ivan

Abstract

We have analysed recorded signs of lynx presence in Slovenia for the period 2000 – 2004 and compared them with the 1995 – 1999 period to determine population status, trends and range.

The analysis included 908 recorded signs of lynx presence, which is an 80% increase compared to the previous five-year period. The lynx monitoring has improved, both in the total number of acquired data, as well as in the share of the higher-reliability data. With regard to lynx presence, Slovenia can be divided into four areas: (1) the southern part, the area south of the Trieste-Ljubljana-Zagreb motorway (Kočevska and Notranjska regions), the area to which the lynx was first reintroduced and where the majority of the lynx in Slovenia are still present today, (2) the north-western part of the country with Julian Alps, the area that the lynx started to colonize in the mid eighties of the previous century, (3) Kamnik-Savinja Alps and some other, isolated areas with occasional lynx presence, (4) other areas (North-eastern and Eastern Slovenia), where lynx are not present. Based on the collected data we estimate there are 30 – 50 animals of this species present in Slovenia, 15 of which live in the western part of the country. The size of the lynx range has not decreased over the last five years, and the number of damage cases has increased. Compared to the previous period the status of the lynx population remained unchanged during the 2000 – 2004 period, and so the Slovenian population still remains one of the most vital populations in the Alps.

Keywords

Slovenia, Lynx lynx , SCALP, monitoring, distribution


Lynx in the Austrian Alps 2000 to 2004


LAASS J., FUXJÄGER Ch., HUBER T., GERSTL N.

Abstract

Based on reports submitted mostly by hunters and from monitoring activities in the national park Kalkalpen we tried to evaluate the status and the distribution of the lynx in the Austrian Alps for the period 2000 to 2004. Reports on lynx presence have been collected by the hunters associations of Styria, Carinthia, Upper Austria and Vorarlberg, by the national park Kalkalpen and by the department of wildlife biology and game management at the University of natural resources and applied life sciences. For the period 2000 to 2004 225 reports on lynx have been documented for the Austrian Alps. 116 of these were classified as category 3 data, 103 reports on prey-remains and tracks have been confirmed by trained people and classified as category 2 data and six reports concerned hard-facts (C1). All hard facts and all verified records originate from two distinct areas – national park Kalkalpen and the Niedere Tauern mountain range. Other areas with lynx reports are the Northeastern Limestone Alps, northwesterm Carinthia and Vorarlberg. Based on the available data we can not determine the actual distribution of the lynx in Austrian Alps or the status of the species in the region. Monitoring efforts by hunters and foresters in the Niedere Tauern mountain range has yielded good data on the local situation of lynx. This has to serve as a model for the future development of the monitoring system in Austria.

Keywords

Lynx lynx , Alps, Austria, monitoring, distribution


Present status and distribution of the lynx in the German Alps 2000-2004


WÖLFL Manfred

Abstract

The short survey of monitoring Lynx lynx in German Alps was reported.

Keywords

Lynx lynx , German Alps, monitoring



FASEL Michael

 

© 2003, Društvo biologov Slovenije –
Journal of Biological Society of Slovenia

Zadnja sprememba:
15.3.2010